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Clean Energy Backers Tout
Jobs at Tri-City Conference

by Kevin McCullen
Tri-City Herald, February 8, 2010

Shelagh and Dennis Bradley, left, of Seattle, talk to Frank Campbell of Sedro Woolley on Sunday at the 10th Harvesting Clean Energy Conference at Three Rivers Convention Center in Kennewick. Around 600 energy industry, agriculture, government and clean energy advocates were at the conference that focused on advancing rural economic development through clean energy production. KENNEWICK -- The expansion of clean energy represents the next major source of economic development and job growth in Washington, and the Tri-Cities is at the epicenter, a Washington congressman said Sunday.

Rep. Jay Inslee, D-Wash., told attendees during the opening day of the 10th Harvesting Clean Energy Conference that more than 11,000 jobs in the state are associated with the production of clean energy -- including hydro, wind, solar, nuclear, biomass and more.

The goal of the conference, which runs through Tuesday at the Three Rivers Convention Center in Kennewick, is to promote rural economic development in the Northwest through clean energy development and production, organizers said.

And passage of energy legislation by Congress this year will help spur creation of even more jobs, said Inslee, a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Agriculture and the development of the aerospace and software industries represented the first three waves of job creation in the state, with clean energy technology the newest rung, he said.

"The Tri-Cities is perfectly positioned for the next great wave of technological development," Inslee said, citing in particular electrical generation work by Energy Northwest and solar technology by Infinia Corp. of Kennewick.

The House already has passed an energy bill. In the Senate, Sens. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and John Kerry, D-Mass., are developing bipartisan energy legislation, Inslee said.

Approval of energy legislation is crucial, Inslee said, and not only for job growth and climate protection. America also is in a research and development race with China to create clean energy technology.

"They have made the decision they want to dominate the clean energy industrial base in the next 10 years," Inslee said.

Conference workshops Sunday included sessions on hydropower, tapping the resources available to farms and rural communities from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the promise of biochar -- charcoal prepared from biomass that is used to generate energy and improve the productivity of soil.

In agriculture and industry, electric vehicles quietly are becoming more commonplace because they don't pollute and have lower long-term maintenance costs.

There are plug-in electric buses and hybrid school buses, short-haul trucks, tractors, forklifts used in agricultural warehouses and an electric utility vehicle -- similar to an ATV -- made by an Oregon-based company.

The electric utility vehicle made by Barefoot Motors of Ashland is being used by ranchers and those involved in vineyards and orchards, electric utilities and forestry companies, among others, because of its workload capacity, low energy and maintenance costs and quiet operation, said Barefoot's Bob Acheson.

Electric vehicles, however, tend to be expensive because of the cost of lead-acid or lithium-ion batteries.

Researchers at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory are working to improve battery technology, said Tim Murphy, who is involved with the lab's advanced vehicle testing effort.

"The potential payoffs for cost-effective batteries are huge for us," Murphy said. "I look at it as a real energy, security and quality of life issue."

Conference workshops today will include sessions on biomass, wind power, Smart Grid technologies and generating energy from food processing waste.

Richard Wynne, director of geopolitical and policy analysis for Boeing, will give the keynote address this morning on agriculture's potential role in developing renewable energy sources for aviation.

Kevin McCullen
Clean Energy Backers Tout Jobs at Tri-City Conference
Tri-City Herald, February 8, 2010

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